Aram Hur

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Seated behind North Korea’s cheerleaders at the Olympics are, from left, Moon Jae-in, South Korea’s president; Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympic Committee; Kim Yong Nam, president of the Presidium of the Supreme People’s Assembly of North Korea; and Kim Yo Jong, the sister of Kim Jong Un. (AFP/Getty Images)

North Korea made an unprecedented move in the 2018 Winter Olympics. It sent athletes to compete — and a squad of peppy cheerleaders — and did so under a “one Korea” banner.

The international media have largely dubbed this diplomatic maneuver a “gold-medal” success. An official delegation led by Kim Yo Jong, Kim Jong Un’s sister, helped North Korea get what it undoubtedly aimed for: At minimum, the regime has a friendly human face; at best, Pyongyang has driven a wedge between South Korea and the United States, even as the regime finds itself increasingly isolated in a nuclear standoff.

Far beyond the network cameras, what would this “one Korea” look like, though?…  Seguir leyendo »