Benjamin A.T. Graham

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de diciembre de 2007. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

In December 2016, Ryszard Petru, center, leader of the opposition party Nowoczesna, holds a sign advocating press freedom along with other lawmakers during a protest in the Sejm, the lower house of the Polish Parliament in Warsaw. The opposition’s occupation of the Parliament building ended Jan. 11. (Marcin Obara/EPA)

Democracy is under attack in Poland, and in other countries as well. For several months, Poland’s ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party has pushed for new limits on judicial independence that would greatly expand the party’s power.

Poles pushed back with mass street protests in July, and the European Union threatened to suspend Poland’s E.U. voting rights — and Polish President Andrzej Duda vetoed key portions of the reforms. In September, Duda floated a compromise plan that would force several prominent judges to retire but avoids giving PiS complete control over their replacements.

The battle over Poland’s judiciary is one chapter in the widespread struggles over the concentration of power in the hands of executives and ruling parties in countries such as Hungary, Turkey, Nicaragua, Venezuela and Russia.…  Seguir leyendo »

A protester clashes with riot police in front of the Greek Parliament in Athens in July 2015. (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)

The Greek government’s ongoing attempts to imprison Andreas Georgiou will reshape the Greek economy — in ways that may last for decades. Georgiou is a statistician who’s been accused by the government of inflating data on the size of the Greek deficit. He’s awaiting trial — for telling the truth about the Greek economy.

Georgiou has been acquitted in four trials since 2011, most recently in December. Greek politicians are still pushing the case, which is now at the Greek Supreme Court. Georgiou appears to be a convenient scapegoat for Greek politicians trying to avoid blame for their country’s ongoing financial crisis.…  Seguir leyendo »

Turkish Cypriot demonstrators wave Turkish and Turkish Cypriot flags during a mass rally in support of Turkey’s Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erodgan following a failed coup that aimed to oust him. Peace talks aimed at reunifying north and south Cyprus resume Jan. 8. (Philippos Christou/Associated Press)

Turkish Cypriot demonstrators wave Turkish and Turkish Cypriot flags during a mass rally in support of Turkey’s Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erodgan following a failed coup that aimed to oust him. Peace talks aimed at reunifying north and south Cyprus resume Jan. 8. (Philippos Christou/Associated Press)[/caption]

On Monday, negotiators will reconvene to try to resolve a four-decade standoff on the island of Cyprus. Since 1974, the island has been divided between north and south. Even its capital city of Nicosia is split in two by the “green line” that divides the Republic of Cyprus, which identifies as Greek, from the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC).…  Seguir leyendo »