Bruce Stokes

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de septiembre de 2009. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

But many back empowering national governments on migration and trade, and they want their own vote on EU membership

Overview: Post-Brexit, Europeans More Favorable Toward EU

Recent years have seen turbulent shifts in public attitudes toward the European Union. Down just a year ago, before the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, public sentiment about the European project has rebounded. Even British voters, who narrowly elected to withdraw from the EU, have markedly improved their views of the Brussels-based institution.

But while few citizens on the European continent are eager to see their own country depart the EU, many want the chance to have their voice heard through their own referendum on EU membership.…  Seguir leyendo »

The tide of people moving across the world, be they immigrants or refugees, has sparked concern in Australia, Europe and the United States. In particular, the ethnic, linguistic and cultural background of migrants has triggered intense debates over the benefits and the costs of growing diversity and the risk of open borders to national identity. Unease over the cultural, economic and security ramifications of immigration helped to fuel the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, encourage the idea of a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border and broaden support for right-wing populist parties in France, Germany and the Netherlands.

Debates over what it means to be a “true” American, Australian, German or other nationality have often highlighted the importance of a person being born in a particular country.…  Seguir leyendo »

The presidential candidacy of Donald Trump catalysed long-simmering frustrations among large segments of the American public. This dissatisfaction contributed to his election as the next US chief executive. Better understanding this public discontent—where it corresponds with candidate Trump’s stated policy positions and where it contradicts them–provides insights into future popular support for potential Trump administration policies, especially those that relate to the rest of the world.

Trump’s campaign slogan ‘Make America Great Again’ touched a raw nerve for many Americans. Roughly eight-in-ten Trump supporters believe that life for people like them is worse today than it was 50 years ago, according to a Pew Research Center survey. And for those older, white males, the American demographic hurt most by the loss of manufacturing jobs and wage stagnation, many of whom apparently voted for Trump, their life may well be worse than it was in the past.…  Seguir leyendo »