Dani Dayan

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de abril de 2009. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

John Kerry’s failed Middle East peace effort has made it clear that a negotiated political agreement is impossible at the moment. The two-state formula enjoyed decades of exclusive stardom, in which its appeal thwarted all innovative and alternative thought.

Government officials in Washington, Brussels and other capitals seem to have no idea how to proceed or are clinging desperately to a bygone idea.

But despair is not an acceptable policy. There are practical issues that can and should be solved. First and foremost, Palestinians deserve drastic and immediate improvements in their everyday lives. Obviously, this is not their main aspiration, but, unlike others, it is feasible right now.…  Seguir leyendo »

In the coming weeks or months Palestinians will likely put an end to the latest peace talks, just as they did in 2000 and 2008. Israel will of course be blamed; however, the reality will remain the same as it has been for the last 20 years: The so-called two-state solution is far from a solution but rather is a recipe for disaster.

Even if by some miracle Secretary of State John F. Kerry and the U.S. administration are able to push through a historic compromise, it may only aggravate the conflict, creating an extremist and belligerent entity on the hills of Judea and Samaria (commonly referred to as the West Bank) overlooking Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Ben Gurion Airport.…  Seguir leyendo »

Whatever word you use to describe Israel’s 1967 acquisition of Judea and Samaria — commonly referred to as the West Bank in these pages — will not change the historical facts. Arabs called for Israel’s annihilation in 1967, and Israel legitimately seized the disputed territories of Judea and Samaria in self-defense. Israel’s moral claim to these territories, and the right of Israelis to call them home today, is therefore unassailable. Giving up this land in the name of a hallowed two-state solution would mean rewarding those who’ve historically sought to destroy Israel, a manifestly immoral outcome.

Of course, just because a policy is morally justified doesn’t mean it’s wise.…  Seguir leyendo »