David Kaye

Este archivo solo abarca los artículos del autor incorporados a este sitio a partir el 1 de mayo de 2007. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

For years, the global spyware industry has operated in the shadows, exposed only by human rights organizations and journalists. The industry claims it’s in the business of fighting crime and terrorism. But its members often sell to governments that equate “criminal” and “terror” with “critic” and “dissent”.

Over the weekend, a global consortium of news organizations, including the Post, joined Forbidden Stories, a Paris-based journalism nonprofit, to reveal how hollow the claims of fighting crime and terror are. The consortium reports that Israel’s NSO Group has sold its marquee spyware, Pegasus, to clients that have deployed it against the very pillars of democratic life: press freedom, the presumption of innocence, privacy, and freedom of expression and association.…  Seguir leyendo »

Libya's rebel leaders say they want to try Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, if and when he is captured, in Libyan courts. In principle, Libyans deserve the satisfaction that only domestic justice can bring. National trials would advance the rule of law and allow Libyans to fully own their political transition.

One problem: the International Criminal Court, based 1,400 miles away in The Hague, has already issued arrest warrants for Colonel Qaddafi, his son and second-in-command Seif al-Islam, and his intelligence chief, Abdullah Senussi. The United Nations Security Council, recognizing that Colonel Qaddafi’s alleged crimes were not just against Libyans but against humanity, asked the I.C.C.…  Seguir leyendo »

On Monday, members of the International Criminal Court gather in Kampala, Uganda, to consider whether to amend the Court’s statute to allow it to exercise jurisdiction over the crime of “aggression.” Previous articles on these pages have argued that the crime is too vague and should be rejected (Michael J. Glennen, April 6), and that criminal responsibility for the illegal use of armed force would make international law more credible (Noah Weisbord, May 4).

By Richard Goldstone, distinguished visitor from the judiciary at the Georgetown University Law Center and former prosecutor at the U.N. Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.…  Seguir leyendo »

Six years ago this Tuesday, President Bush granted American armed forces sweeping authority to detain and interrogate foreign members of Al Qaeda and their supporters and to use military commissions to try them. By doing so, the president set in motion the creation of military commissions and the detention camp in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

The Bush administration may legitimately claim certain benefits from the Guantánamo system. Some dangerous men are held there, and valuable intelligence has probably been gathered, perhaps even some that has enabled the government to disrupt terrorist activities.

But the costs have been high. Guantánamo has come to be seen worldwide as a stain on America’s reputation.…  Seguir leyendo »