David Kaye

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de mayo de 2009. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

Libya’s rebel leaders say they want to try Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, if and when he is captured, in Libyan courts. In principle, Libyans deserve the satisfaction that only domestic justice can bring. National trials would advance the rule of law and allow Libyans to fully own their political transition.

One problem: the International Criminal Court, based 1,400 miles away in The Hague, has already issued arrest warrants for Colonel Qaddafi, his son and second-in-command Seif al-Islam, and his intelligence chief, Abdullah Senussi. The United Nations Security Council, recognizing that Colonel Qaddafi’s alleged crimes were not just against Libyans but against humanity, asked the I.C.C.…  Seguir leyendo »

On Monday, members of the International Criminal Court gather in Kampala, Uganda, to consider whether to amend the Court’s statute to allow it to exercise jurisdiction over the crime of “aggression.” Previous articles on these pages have argued that the crime is too vague and should be rejected (Michael J. Glennen, April 6), and that criminal responsibility for the illegal use of armed force would make international law more credible (Noah Weisbord, May 4).

By Richard Goldstone, distinguished visitor from the judiciary at the Georgetown University Law Center and former prosecutor at the U.N. Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.…  Seguir leyendo »