Jonathan Dugas

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de mayo de 2009. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

Few sports performances are regarded without suspicion these days. Nowhere was this more evident than in the recent Tour de France, where the winner, Chris Froome of the British Team Sky, spent three weeks responding to skeptics about his exceptional performances, which rivaled those of doped champions, including Lance Armstrong.

Then there are the recent doping allegations made by several athletes and staff against the former marathoner Alberto Salazar, head coach of the Nike Oregon Project, a training program for elite distance runners. (Mr. Salazar has denied the allegations.) Among the project’s athletes is the double Olympic gold medalist Mo Farah, who was questioned by the United States Anti-Doping Agency last week as part of its investigation into Mr.…  Seguir leyendo »

Survivors of this year’s Tour de France are to ride into Paris today after racing 2,131 miles over 23 days, including daunting climbs through the Pyrenees and the Alps. For the first time in years, evidence suggests that doping may not be playing the dominant role it once did.

More than any other sport, bicycling has been linked to drugs. Podium finishers in nearly every Tour over at least the last two decades have failed drug tests, admitted to doping or been linked to high-profile investigations.

Viewers have tended to regard the winners with a bit of disbelief.

But the sport appears to have turned the corner and is regaining some credibility, thanks to the antidoping efforts of a new generation of riders, managers and fans.…  Seguir leyendo »