Peter Greste

Nota: Este archivo abarca los artículos publicados por el autor desde el 1 de febrero de 2008. Para fechas anteriores realice una búsqueda entrecomillando su nombre.

‘A free press is universally recognised as essential to the way any democracy should work – that’s why it is hard-wired into most democratic constitutions.’ Photograph: David Gray/AAP

For any law to be effective, there needs to be clarity. Most legislation is so mind-numbingly formal and technical because it is drafted to avoid any confusion about exactly what the law allows, what it forbids, who it applies to and the consequences of breaching it.

Yet, when it comes to the role of the media in Australia, legislated confusion abounds.

A free press is universally recognised as essential to the way any democracy should work – that’s why it is hard-wired into most democratic constitutions. The First Amendment to the US constitution protects press freedom there. The Human Rights Act does it in the United Kingdom.…  Seguir leyendo »

There is no such thing as a little bit of justice. Either justice is done, or it’s not. And in the case of my colleagues and I, arrested in Egypt in December 2013 and accused of collaborating with a banned organisation, justice has still not been served.

We went through a trial universally condemned as a travesty, convicted and sentenced to seven years in prison – with an extra three years for my colleague Mohamed Baher for possessing a single souvenir bullet casing. Even Egypt’s appeals court dismissed the original trial as “flawed” and “contradictory” and overturned the convictions. Then, on 1 February this year, Egypt’s president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi ordered me out of the country before the retrial could begin, and at the first hearing several weeks later, my colleagues Baher and Mohamed Fahmy and four others accused in our case were all released on bail.…  Seguir leyendo »