Georgia

Georgia is on the cusp of a very important decision about nuclear energy. We shouldn’t miss what’s at stake.

The Georgia Public Service Commission will probably rule this week on whether work should continue on two nuclear reactors under construction near Augusta, the only commercial nuclear project underway in the United States. The commission has been enthusiastic about nuclear power for years, but since it authorized Georgia Power in 2009 to break ground for two new reactors at the Alvin W. Vogtle generating station, the financial calculus has changed. Mainly, the price of natural gas, an important competing fuel for electricity generation, has dropped sharply, and taken the wholesale price of electricity down with it.…  Seguir leyendo »

Armenia

Anahit Shirinyan

As the world tries to decipher what Trump presidency means for the global world order and security in Europe, the same questions are asked in Armenia. The US continues not to have a clear-cut policy towards the South Caucasus, and Trump’s tenure is unlikely to change this. Instead, Washington’s relations with Yerevan, Tbilisi and Baku are likely to remain an undertone to the larger dynamics of US relations with Russia, Turkey and Iran, as well as developments in the Middle East. In this context, some potential pitfalls might affect the overall geopolitical environment in which Armenia operates with implications for Armenian foreign policy.…  Seguir leyendo »

Tomorrow, the State of Georgia intends to execute William Sallie, who was convicted of killing a man in 1990. It would be Georgia’s ninth execution this year, a modern state record and nearly twice the previous high-water mark of five executions, set first in 1987 and again in 2015.

I served as a justice on the Supreme Court of Georgia for over 15 years. During that time I participated in dozens of death-penalty cases and affirmed many of them. That experience, though, exposed me to some of the significant flaws in the system — not just the injustice of the death penalty itself, but specific problems with the way capital cases are handled.…  Seguir leyendo »

A lo largo de sus años en el poder, Eduard Shevardnadze fue conocido como el “zorro plateado”, un hombre que parecía deslizarse sin esfuerzo de ser el líder de la Georgia soviética y miembro del Politburó del Kremlin a ministro de exteriores reformista de Mijaíl Gorbachov, para luego resurgir como presidente post-soviético prooccidental de Georgia, irónicamente como opositor a Gorbachov. Se veía a sí mismo como un héroe que liberó a Georgia del yugo de Rusia. Fue también uno de los políticos más corruptos de la historia de su país.

En sus últimos años de vida, Shevardnadze se había convertido en un paria político en Georgia, Occidente y Rusia, donde se lo veía como uno de los arquitectos de la disolución de la Unión Soviética.…  Seguir leyendo »

I vividly remember the time and place when I knew that the Cold War had ended. It was Aug. 3, 1990, at Vnukovo II Airport outside Moscow. I stood shoulder to shoulder with the foreign minister of the Soviet Union as history was made when we jointly declared our countries’ opposition to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and called for an arms embargo on Iraq, then a Soviet client state. My counterpart was Eduard Shevardnadze. While he was an adversary, he was also a trusted diplomatic partner. In time, he would become a close friend. My biases should therefore be clear: I liked and admired the man.…  Seguir leyendo »

A quelques centaines de kilomètres de la Crimée, le Sud-Caucase observe avec inquiétude la montée de la tension en Ukraine. Terre des « conflits gelés », l’Abkhazie, le Haut-Karabakh et l’Ossétie du Sud se sont proclamés indépendants à la suite de mouvements séparatistes qui ont profondément déstabilisé de jeunes Etats à peine sortis du système soviétique.

Dès les années 1990, l’Azerbaïdjan et la Géorgie avaient cru trouver aide et protection auprès des puissances occidentales qui voulaient voir dans les ressources énergétiques de la Caspienne une alternative. Les tubes devaient apporter les ressources indispensables à des économies fragiles, ils allaient également assurer la sécurité à une Géorgie aux rapports déjà difficiles avec la Russie.…  Seguir leyendo »

As the Winter Olympics begin in Sochi, a close Russian ally in Ukraine is suppressing and shooting pro-democracy protesters.

One could be forgiven for thinking that the hour of triumph for autocrats and the retreat of democrats is at hand as the world gathers to celebrate the shining rule of Czar Vladimir.

But do the Sochi Olympics really prove that President Vladimir V. Putin’s model of oil-fueled authoritarianism is the only one that can bring happiness and prosperity to Russia and the region?

Though my country, Georgia, has almost no oil, it might hold the answer. For the last nine years, Georgia has been growing at a higher rate than Russia.…  Seguir leyendo »

Five years after the Russian-Georgian war captured world attention, the South Caucasus — Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia — continues to face huge challenges. The region’s geopolitical importance is ebbing as global energy production expands and NATO winds down in Afghanistan. The three countries also face major security risks, unmet popular expectations and governance failures. For the South Caucasus, this is a time for choices.

Security issues plague the South Caucasus. Russia’s military occupies two “independent” enclaves in Georgia — Abkhazia and South Ossetia — and some contiguous land. A two-decade military standoff persists around Nagorno-Karabakh, populated by ethnic Armenians but lying within Azerbaijan.…  Seguir leyendo »

I recently travelled to Georgia and Armenia to meet human rights groups. After two days in Georgia we drove east, the hilly landscape gradually turning mountainous, sheep and cattle tended by shepherds in littered, post-Soviet villages. For a long time the road followed a small river, plastic trash snagging on rocks and branches. This could have been a landscape of extraordinary beauty; instead it was depleted and scarred by nearly a century of bad or indifferent governance.

Crossing the border into Armenia, the river was still there, the litter now older, almost indistinguishable from the brown water and grey rock. There were remnants of the Soviet state – giant concrete chutes channelling water from the steep mountains, occasional blocks of flats now, like the rubbish, taking on the colour of the dark earth.…  Seguir leyendo »

Weeks after Georgia’s free and fair parliamentary election and an acclaimed peaceful transfer of power to the opposition, democratic gains are being thrown into question by a spate of arrests of high-ranking officials of the previous government of Mikheil Saakashvili, despite the fact that he remains president.

Saakashvili’s former defense and interior minister, ranking officials of the Interior Ministry, the chief of the armed forces general staff and the vice mayor of Tbilisi are among those who have been arrested. Charges brought against them by the new government of Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili, a billionaire businessman, include abuse of office, illegal detention and torture.…  Seguir leyendo »

With the triumph of the “Georgian Dream” alliance, led by the billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, over Mikheil Saakashvili’s United National Movement in the Georgian parliamentary elections — and a crucial, civil acknowledgment of this defeat by President Saakashvili — democracy in Georgia has made one giant leap forward. And this is a good deal for pretty much everyone.

This is first and foremost good for the Georgian people. Since the extra-constitutional but widely admired “Rose Revolution” in 2003, Saakashvili’s “modernizing” policies have certainly helped clean up bribery, eliminate chronic power outages and set the stage for economic growth. Much credit is due for these contributions to a state that was teetering on the brink of failure in the wake of President Eduard Shevardnadze’s second term.…  Seguir leyendo »

In April 1987, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher visited Moscow and Tbilisi on what she described as “the most fascinating and most important visit” she had made as prime minister. The Iron Lady’s visit fully revealed the cracks in the Soviet system and gave her the resolve to work with President Reagan to break the tyranny of communism.

Now, 25 years later, modern Georgia is implementing reforms that encapsulate Mrs. Thatcher’s belief in democracy, free markets, a strong defense and liberty. President Mikheil Saakashvili came to power after the peaceful 2003 Rose Revolution and has set his focus on gaining membership in the European Union and NATO.…  Seguir leyendo »

Un homme d’affaires établi et sans aucune expérience en politique n’y fait pas ses débuts à la légère. J’ai fait le choix de créer un mouvement politique en Géorgie car je suis très inquiet de l’autoritarisme rampant du gouvernement du président Mikheïl Saakashvili. Sa manière de penser et son comportement modelés sur le principe de l’Etat c’est moi, déséquilibrent la Géorgie et amoindrissent la capacité de mon pays à se réformer avec succès.

Si la société ne se stabilise pas grâce à des contre-pouvoirs, la Géorgie continuera sur la voie de l’isolement croissant et de l’appauvrissement. Si le parti majoritaire continue ainsi de s’accrocher au pouvoir au-delà des élections législatives d’octobre 2012, puis de l’élection présidentielle qui aura lieu un an plus tard, les réformes nécessaires ne verront toujours pas le jour et le pays sera ravagé par une instabilité politique et économique accrue.…  Seguir leyendo »

Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili accuses Russia of staging violent attacks across the administrative boundary lines (ABLs) of Abkhazia and South Ossetia. Despite a cease-fire agreement that ended the 2008 Russia-Georgia war, relations are tense – and getting worse. Renewed violence could risk the “reset” in U.S.-Russian relations, undermining cooperation that is critical to preventing proliferation by Iran and in hot spots such as Afghanistan and Libya.

On Aug. 7, 2008, Russia’s 58th Battalion stormed into South Ossetia, and Russian warplanes hit targets across Georgia. Russian troops halted their offensive just 25 miles from Tbilisi. Despite the six-point cease-fire agreement that ended hostilities, Russia has pursued policies aimed at weakening Georgia and getting rid of Mr.…  Seguir leyendo »

The Republic of Georgia in the Caucasus is on the cusp of change. Beyond street protests, there is a deep polarization in society that bespeaks an unrest that will not be stopped until the government changes and democratic reforms finally are introduced.

I know this government and its shortcomings firsthand. I served for two years as its ambassador to the United Nations. I resigned in late 2008 because I disagreed with the erratic, unilateral decision-making of President Mikheil Saakashvili and his government.

The government’s inability to tolerate alternative views led my country into an armed conflict with Russia that we had no chance of winning.…  Seguir leyendo »

Enfin le bout du tunnel! A la suite de ce qui sera la négociation d’adhésion la plus longue de l’histoire, la Russie entrevoit enfin la lumière. Même Pascal Lamy, le directeur général de l’OMC, d’habitude très prudent sur ce dossier, a convenu dans un communiqué de presse que l’adhésion de la Russie à l’organisation devenait «un objectif possible» et qu’on avait assisté à une nette accélération du processus depuis six mois. Moscou a donc mis l’énergie nécessaire dans la négociation, relève-t-on à Genève. Echéance prévue: été 2011.

Il faut dire que le parcours aura été chaotique. Lancées par Boris Eltsine au début de la période de privatisation, les négociations se sont ensuite enlisées pour des questions de politique interne au Kremlin – une forte opposition de l’économie domestique russe – et externe à la Russie – l’opposition des Etats-Unis et de nombreux pays est-européens de l’ancienne zone d’influence soviétique.…  Seguir leyendo »

Though disagreements remain over how the conflict began, there is no denying that two years ago this weekend, Russian troops crossed an internationally recognized border and invaded Georgia. They attacked all of the country with strategic bombers, pushed deep into its sovereign territory, displaced nearly 127,000 ethnic Georgians from their homes, recognized Abkhazia and South Ossetia as independent states, and established a military occupation that remains in effect.

Much has changed in the past two years — but not for the better. Russia not only occupies Georgian territory but is building military bases there, denying access to humanitarian missions and monitors, permitting the ethnic cleansing of Georgians in South Ossetia, and working to fortify the administrative boundary lines of the breakaway regions into hardened borders.…  Seguir leyendo »

The release of a much anticipated EU-commissioned report into the causes of the Russian-Georgian war of August 2008 predictably spread the blame for the conflict around. Georgia got its share of the blame, but the text of the report is devastating to Russia’s narrative of the conflict.

Assisted by a small army of experts, Swiss diplomat Heidi Tagliavini has spent close to a year investigating the origins of a small war that shocked Europe, but that was largely forgotten in the midst of the global economic crisis that succeeded it. The 40-page report – with a thousand pages of appendices – will certainly be the subject of great debate and controversy.…  Seguir leyendo »

Analogies between Georgia and the states of western Europe are difficult to maintain: it is precisely because the Euro-Atlantic community has reached a maturity in its mutual relationships that so many of us in Georgia want to be part of it.

But bear with me, please, on this.

Imagine if, last year, Britain and Spain had gone to war over Gibraltar and a report commissioned by the European Union into the conflict had just been published. It said Spain fired the first shots, in a clear breach of international law, and that Britain’s response – to invade Spain and to sponsor ethnic cleansing by Gibraltarian militias – was equally illegal.…  Seguir leyendo »

Por la decisión adoptada el 2 de diciembre de 2008, el Consejo de la Unión Europea encargó a una Misión Internacional Independiente de Investigación que investigara el conflicto de agosto de 2008 en Georgia. El Consejo me nombró Jefe de la Misión de Investigación, y dejó en mis manos todos los trámites y decisiones relativas a los métodos de funcionamiento. Ya hemos concluido nuestro trabajo y remitido el informe al Consejo, a las partes en conflicto, a la Organización para la Seguridad y la Cooperación en Europa (OSCE) y a Naciones Unidas.

Es un placer para mí agradecer al consejo de la UE su fe y su confianza.…  Seguir leyendo »